Select Page

It’s actually harder than you think to find out what’s going on in county government.


 

Dear Neighbor,

Over the next 30 days, I’m going to explore becoming a candidate for Harris County Judge. Here’s why:

Many, if not most of my friends, neighbors and colleagues know very little about county government – how it spends its billions of tax dollars or how it addresses a long list of problems such as flood prevention, traffic, transit, road conditions, crime, health care, mental health care and criminal justice reform.

It’s actually harder than you think to find out what’s going on in county government.

Certainly, Hurricane Harvey has raised a number of very serious questions, with more being asked every day. Has our county been proactive when it comes to flood prevention? If not, why wasn’t it at least reactive when it had the chance after the Tax Day Flood and Memorial Day Flood?

Even before Harvey, I got a closer look than most at county government through my work with the Houston Food Bank, the Houston Long Range Financial Management Task Force, Planned Parenthood and the Houston Parks Board. I was not impressed.

I watched the neighborhood in which I raised my four children fill with muddy water from the release from Addicks Dam. I watched the 20-minute bimonthly County Commission meetings move into private sessions. I watched the incumbent Harris County Judge – who boasts of his expertise in transportation policy – fail to develop a comprehensive transportation strategy, or a strategy to develop a countywide park system or to improve the quality of our air and water.

As I watched all of this, I knew we needed a change.

Over the next 30 days, I’m going to explore becoming a candidate for Harris County Judge. I’m going to continue talking with leaders, policy experts, voters and donors. I’m going to keep asking questions about why so much of our county government appears to be underwater.

I’ve learned many valuable lessons in my three decades of experience as a leader in large business and nonprofit organizations. Problems fester if you don’t address them. Saying, “It’s not my job” is not a reliable strategy. And there is no accountability without financial transparency and comprehensive ethics rules.

If I can help our county do a better job, and if I can put together a winning campaign, then I’m in. If not, I’ll continue to work from the outside to bring change. The status quo is not good enough.

Please share your thoughts – I’d love to see them. Thank you.

Warm regards,

Pol. adv. Mike Nichols campaign